October 2009

Mauro Vecchi has covered just about all the of the most popular optical illusions with graceful and brief animations. When I first watched this, I wondered if I should just give up and go on vacation. But I’m inspired. The trick of optical illusions serves to break down into simple disctinctions information on how our eyes and brain interact with the world. So this video instead of being the final say is really more the opening dialogue. The task ahead is to bridge the optical illusions to creating beauty in art through an understanding of how we see. Enjoy.

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Albers Artwork

by gabemott on October 1, 2009 · 0 comments

Josef Albers, Homage to the Square: Midday, 1954-57, from the Hirshhorn collection Albers: A German-born American artist, was a student at the cutting edge Weimar Bauhaus in 1920. Two of his Homage to the Square series have been loaned to the Obamas

Josef Albers, Homage to the Square: Midday, 1954-57, from the Hirshhorn collection Albers: A German-born American artist, was a student at the cutting edge Weimar Bauhaus in 1920. Two of his Homage to the Square series have been loaned to the Obamas

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32 Poles

Post image for 32 Poles

by gabemott on October 1, 2009 · 0 comments

With 32 Poles, I was going for a much more subtle effect than in the 3 other pole pages. By using a blue and orange that are complements and are closer in value and as well using a greater number of poles, the steps are more subtle and the effect is more powerful. Almost the entire row of 31 poles will appear orange when the last pole is selected and matches the background. And vis versa, when the far left pole is selected, the rest of the poles look blue.

In addition, the grid on the far left allows you to see the poles against a stronger blue and stronger orange than the extreme left and right poles. It also allows you to clear your eye fatigue by opting for a clear white, black or neutral gray background.

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